Minutes

IX SIG

Thursday 24 February 2005, Kyoto International Conference Hall

Meeting commenced: 2:00 pm

Chair: Philip Smith

Co-chair: Che-Hoo Cheng

The Chair introduced the SIG and explained the agenda, noting that at this meeting, the response has been so strong that there will be two sessions for the IX SIG. He also encouraged participants to take part in discussions on the mailing list.

Review of previous open action items

  • None

Contents

  1. Bangladesh-BDIX update
  2. VNIX update
  3. JPNAP update
  4. JPIX update
  5. DIX-IE and NSP-IXP3 update
  6. A quality service research report of IX in Taiwan
  7. MPLS-IX and InterIX operation
  8. MAE EXT interconnecting regional IXes together
  9. Update on Netnod Internet exchange
  10. Euro-IX update
  11. AMS-IX update
  12. IX tour of the world
  1. Bangladesh-BDIX update

  2. Sumon Ahmed Sabir, BDCOM Online

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This speaker gave an update on the operations of BDIX, which commenced in August 2004. There are currently 11 ISPs peering there. The presenter noted that the peering policy has now been drafted and the routers have been configured. The presenter provided a review of the traffic measurements. Traffic is not high yet, but appears to be increasing constantly. One reason suggested for the low local traffic is that most of the local content is actually hosted abroad. ISPs are now trying to obtain mirrors of popular web sites. There is also an intention to get a root server mirror at BDIX.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  3. VNIX update

  4. Tran Kien, VNNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    Before the establishment of the Vietnam National Internet Exchange, there was no domestic IX in Vietnam. VNIX was established in November 2003. It now has two separate points established, in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, with four major local ISPs connected. The presentation contains an overview of the VNIX physical and network infrastructure. VNIX is a neutral IXP, which is currently free of charge. Terminal equipment and connections are built by the members themselves. The presenter showed the VNIX connectivity map. The traffic measurements were displayed. It was noted that the total traffic is more than 300 Mbps, almost evenly split between the two points. VNIX is starting an IPv6 testbed. They will support multicast and mirror a DNS root server.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a clarification of the number of ISPs peering in each of the points.
    • The dates of establishment of each point were also clarified.
    • It was noted that the connection is free of charge, but there may be charges in the future.
    • There was a question about the use of IPv6. It was noted that one of the members currently holds an IPv6 allocation.
    • VNIX is for domestic operation only. There was also a discussion about VNIX’s total international capacity.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  5. JPNAP update

  6. Toshinori Ishii, JPNAP

    Presentation [pdf]

    JNAP is one of the biggest IXs in the world. It is located in Tokyo and Osaka with a total traffic volume of more than 60Gbps and includes the JPNAP6 IPv6 service. Traffic is still growing. Many users are already using 10GE, which has been available at JPNAP for two years. JPNAP has found almost no interoperability problems with 10GE equipment. JPNAP uses an optical switch for redundancy, which provides very fast switching and no impact for communication between IX and ISP routers.

    JPNAP uses sFlow for traffic engineering. The presentation includes some router to router statistics. JPNAP is also a Euro-IX associate member.

    Questions and discussion

    • The traffic through Tokyo is approximately 50Gbps and Osaka traffic is currently about 14Gbps.
    • It was noted that about three or four members use multiple 10GE links.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  7. JPIX update

  8. Takejiro Takabayashi, JPIX

    Presentation [pdf]

    JPIX is a joint venture of major ISPs in Japan, launched in July 1997. JPIX provides various statistics and measurement services to members. There is also an automated peering system and an NTP server. JPIX offers 10Gbps, 1Gbps, and 100Mbps ports, remote access and collation services. The presenter reviewed the distributed nature of JPIX and discussed the various switch locations. He also provided an overview of the main network architecture. JPIX has been offering an experimental IPv6 service, free of port charge for JPIX customers. Currently there are 16 customers connected to the IPv6 service. Total traffic volume to Tokyo and Nagoya combined has grown to 37 Gbps. There are currently 109 ISPs connected to JPIX, most connected to GbE ports.

    Questions and discussion

    • There are no traffic charges for traffic between the different points – only port charges.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  9. DIX-IE and NSP-IXP3 update

  10. Akira Kato, WIDE

    Presentation [pdf]

    The speaker provided a summary of the Japanese traffic growth measurements released by the Japanese Ministry of Information and Communications. This study estimated a total traffic volume of 324Gbps, not including intra-ISP traffic and traffic from non-participating ISPs. One third of all traffic currently depends on major IXs.

    NSPIXP-2 has been updated and renamed as DIX-IE. It features multiple GbE or 10GE interconnects. DIX-IE currently has 85 ISPs, five of which have 10GE access. The presenter noted that traffic growth has basically stalled but could surge in the event of a problem with other exchanges.

    NSPIXP-3 is the oldest IX in Osaka. It now has three locations. There are 23 ISPs connected. Current traffic level here is approximately 4Gbps.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was noted that there appears to have been a drop in traffic in Osaka, in favour of connections in Tokyo.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  11. A quality service research report of IX in Taiwan

  12. Ching Chiao, TWNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation was a summary of the results of a project of TWNIC and the Taiwan government regarding the current status of IXs in Taiwan. There are four IXs in operation in Taiwan, all of which are for-profit organisations. The presenter discussed a summary of IX data exchange volume in Taiwan and noted that statistics and interconnection diagrams are publicly available via the TWNIC web site. The response rate to the study was about 60 percent of the ISPs approached. The majority of Taiwan ISPs indicated that they want a public authority to sponsor an IX. The majority of ISPs also want multilateral rather than bilateral peering agreements. Currently, only 37 percent of the ISPs in Taiwan are connected to the existing IXs. It was noted that in Taiwan, the demand for domestic peering is stronger than international peering.

    The project has proposed several things. It proposes establishing a supervising institution, transforming the TANet into an incorporated entity to operate as an IX, and seeking co-funding from ISPs to form a new IX. The study also seeks to enhance service efficiency and has proposed several aspects of ISP operations to measure. The study also seeks to establish guidelines for IX operation in Taiwan.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a specific question about a local peering arrangement, which will be discussed outside the meeting.
    • It was noted that there is still a significant degree of intra-Taiwan traffic going through international connections, especially Hong Kong and the US.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  13. MPLS-IX and InterIX operation

  14. Santoru Matsuhima, MPLS

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presenter gave a brief overview of MPLS-IX, which is a solution to applying MPLS to IXs. The benefits of MPLS-IX are media independency, scalability of distributed IXs, and internetworking among current IXs. The presenter then discussed a commercial MPLS-IX product, “mplsASSOCIO”, which was launched in November 2002 and which currently has about 30 customers distributed throughout Japan. He reviewed the current traffic measurements, and showed the customer web site which carries this traffic information.

    The presenter then discussed Inter-IX operation and a joint effort between mplsASSOCIO and WIDE DIX-IE. He described how eBGP peering is managed over MPLS LSP.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • None.

    [Break 3:30 – 4:00 pm]

    Top

  15. MAE EXT interconnecting regional IXes together

  16. Thomas Bechly, MCI

    Presentation [pdf]

    The speaker described issues relating to remote peering. MAE EXT has recently released a product that allows remote peering, which could be viewed as a VPN extranet. It is a use-based service with asymmetrical billing. The presentation contains the general specifications of the service. The service handles IPv4 and IPv6. MAE management routers function as test points for the customer edge. MAE also sells transit across this platform (currently IPv4 only, with IPv6 transit expected to be available by late 2005). PeerMaker is a web-based provisioning tool that allows customers to build and maintain their own connections. It also allows various monitoring and management functions. The presenter provided an overview of the geographical presence of the current and planned service sites. He also discussed the plans for extended global peering. The presentation includes diagrams describing the extended peering topology of this service, showing how tunnelling is implemented, and showing how trunk failover is achieved.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a discussion about how this service is being positioned. It was described as a suite of services that provides access to transit, partial transit, and the ability to network or peer across the Internet. It is not expected to supplant high bandwidth IXs.
    • The pricing of the VPN service is typically lower than normal transit costs.
    • This service is different from MAE East and MAE West, which are switch-based exchanges. It will inter-work back with those switch-based services.
    • It was noted that this service provides a low cost, alternative transport medium.
    • There was a concern that those operating in areas with existing switch fabric may need to extend trust for not causing problems to the switch fabrics to the customers of the services. However it was explained that the model for this service should not lead to such problems.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  17. Update on Netnod Internet exchange

  18. Kurtis Erik Lindqvist, Netnod

    Presentation [pdf]

    Netnod is run by a foundation and was created in 1996-1997, with an early focus on redundant systems. The presenter provided a brief history of the formation of Netnod, including the government report that cited the Internet as a critical national infrastructure. Netnod has been influenced by a view of national security. Because of this, and the geographic span of Sweden, it was decided to adopt a physically distributed model. The presenter noted the problems of selecting the locations, including those raised by the sparse population of northern Sweden and available carrier capacity at the time. There are currently five locations across Sweden. The expectation of seeing benefits for local exchange of traffic was not as straightforward as first thought. Now, there is more awareness of the benefits of local traffic exchange.

    Netnod exchange points are located in secure bunkers in mountain caves established by the government for critical PSTN infrastructure. This has provided a benefit to established Swedish carriers, which already had phone equipment established in the caves. It has been less beneficial for smaller carriers, especially international operators. The caves are built to operate in a crisis and have full living facilities deep inside the mountains. Netnod rents rooms in the caves.

    Netnod has been developing and expanding the available services at these exchanges. One of the services is a copy of the RIPE routing registry. I-root servers are also hosted in these facilities and deployed in several international locations via anycast. Netnod is also developing atomic clock services that will be G.811 compliant.

    There are currently 69 customers connected across the various locations. The presenter showed traffic measurements for the various points. The total peak of traffic is about 23Gbps. Netnod supports IPv4 and IPv6 services.

    Questions and discussion

    • Netnod currently uses gigabit Internet switches in the facilities. All of the production equipment is located in the mountains.
    • The fibre paths are well protected. It was noted that only the city and the fibre operator know the fibre paths, which are generally 40 metres below ground.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  19. Euro-IX update

  20. Serge Radovic, Euro-IX

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    Euro-IX was formed in May 2001, to provide peering services, inform the community about peering, and to provide a platform for IXPs to exchange information and come together to resolve common industry related issues. Euro-IX is not an IXP itself. It is now also accepting members outside of Europe.

    The total aggregation of the 34 affiliated European member IXPs is about 280Gbps. The total connected base in Europe is about 1800, representing 1100 ASNs and averaging 155Mbps per customer.

    The presentation contains a profile of the Euro-IX membership base. Euro-IX provides two meetings each year, a web portal, and regulatory services to advise of new laws that may affect IXPs. Euro-IX also provides video conferencing services for its members. It coordinates benchmarking data, runs mailing lists, and holds information repositories for members.

    The presenter reviewed the purpose of the IXP Switch Database, which is used to help IXPs plan software upgrades and other issues. The presenter noted that there is a great deal of willingness among member IXPs to share information and staff knowledge.

    Euro-IX charges membership fees to support its operations. Non-European members join as associate members, paying half the membership fee but not receiving voting rights. The presenter encouraged proposals for additional activities or services.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  21. AMS-IX update

  22. Henk Steenman, AMS-IX

    Presentation [pdf]

    The Amsterdam Internet Exchange AMS-IX is a not-for-profit, neutral IXP with 212 members, the majority of which are international countries. It is a membership-based organisation. The presenter described the corporate and organisational structure of AMS-IX.

    AMS-IX has four locations for connection to the switch platform. These are all in separate data centres spread through Amsterdam. It operates a flat fee service based on the type of port used. It delivers Internet peering VLAN as its major service. A service of growing importance is the Global Roaming Exchange (GRX) VLAN. There is also a Dutch mobile network operator service and specific services for closed user groups.

    The presentation contains an overview of the equipment used and the switch topology, which includes switch redundancy at the core.

    Since 1997, there has been linear growth in membership and ports. The traffic increases at an average of about 10 percent per month. AMS-IX now uses the RIPE TTM services to do detailed performance measurements. The presenter displayed some of the typical measurements.

    AMS-IX now intends to install route servers, due to the growth in BGP sessions. It expects continuing growth in both members and ports and plans to improve the availability of the equipment.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  23. IX tour of the world

  24. Bill Woodcock, PCH

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation compares the IXP environment in different regions around the world. Europe has a small number of big IXPs (London and Amsterdam) and a large number of much smaller exchanges. This is because of the need for international carriers to have a small number of exchanges to use for European traffic. The presentation contains a map of cable paths from Europe to other parts of the world.

    The presenter maintains a public spreadsheet of IXP data from around the world.

    In North America, there are two major exchange points (on East and West coasts) and many smaller exchanges clustered near major population centres. Again, the presenter displayed fibre paths from North American to the rest of the world. North American exchanges tend to be more secretive about their operational information than the European ones.

    Africa also has two large exchanges, in Cairo and Johannesburg. Africa has a relatively small number of exchange points, mostly in Eastern Africa and not corresponding to the fibre paths or even population centres. The presenter showed summaries of African IX statistics, which tend to be relatively low. There is an expectation that new competition will finally bring growth to South African exchange traffic. The presenter noted that good policies in Dar es Salaam have led to healthy levels of activity.

    In Latin America, Brazil is one of the most significant countries in terms of exchange activity. There are good fibre paths connecting Latin America, but there are problems arising from lack of competition. The presenter noted that there is a lack of available data for many of the Latin American exchanges.

    The largest exchanges in the Asia Pacific are in Tokyo, Seoul, and Hong Kong. The pattern of activity in this region is quite different to Europe and North America. The presenter noted that international carriers are not meeting each other in Seoul, which is dominated by local traffic. The Asia Pacific has many medium-sized exchanges. The data from the Asian IXes showed aggregated information from some city exchanges. There has been strong growth shown in the Indonesian exchange, which was established with a very low budget.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was noted that there was no detail in this presentation of much of Central Asia, the former Soviet states, and the Middle East. It was explained that there is not very much activity in these regions.

    Action items

    • None.

Meeting closed: 5:45 pm

Minuted by: Gerard Ross

Top

Open action items

  • None.

Minutes | IX SIG


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