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Minutes

SIG: IX

Wednesday 25 February 2004, Palace of the Golden Horses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Minutes

Meeting commenced: 11:00 am

Chair: Philip Smith

The Chair introduced the SIG and explained the agenda.

Contents

  1. Open action items
  2. Auckland Peering Exchange and WIX update
  3. West Australia Internet Exchange update
  4. Introduction and status update for the LINX
  5. Introduction and status update for the Euro-IX
  6. JPNAP update
  7. IIX (Indonesian Internet eXchange) status report

Questions and discussion

  • None.
  1. Open action items

  2. Philip Smith, Cisco

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    Action ix-16-001: APNIC should clarify the guidelines for the ASN policy in relation to multihoming.

    Update: Closed.

    The Chair displayed the AS number policy document that incorporated the requested changes. It was commented that the AS number application form also documented that connecting to an IXP was an acceptable justification for an AS number.

    Top

  3. Auckland Peering Exchange and WIX update

  4. Andy Linton, CityLink

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation summarised the current state of New Zealand peering exchanges and proposed exchanges for the future. The presenter noted that the Auckland Peering Exchange (APE) also maintained a mirror of the F-Root server. The speaker explained the nature of the distributed peering environment of the WIX.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was asked if there were any participants peered with more than one session. The speaker answered that there were such participants.
    • It was noted that the 300 hundred buildings connected to the WIX exchange was a very large number. The speaker was asked if there were any problems associated with this large number. The speaker explained that the approach to the architecture of the exchange had evolved over time. The architect for the exchange had previously built power grids, so had a different approach to the design.
    • It was clarified that the total number of participants at Auckland was no more that forty or so, but that the speaker would check on the figure after the SIG.
    • The speaker clarified that he had no figure on the traffic over Auckland, but that most connections are 100Mbps. The speaker had no figures on the total number of terabits per month the exchange was handling. Peak loads rose from the normal 10Mbps to 620 Mbps during the premier of Lord of the Rings due to webcam usage.

    Top

  5. West Australia Internet Exchange update

  6. Gavin Tweedie, WAIX

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation summarised the operations of the WAIX, which currently has 52 peers. In June 2003, the exchange was averaging traffic at 85 Mbps but currently averages 200Mbps over a 24 hour timeframe. The presenter reported on the infrastructure used at the exchange and the costs for participants. The speaker explained that WAIX facilitates native and tunnelled IPv6, and is participating in the INOC DBA project.

    Questions and discussion

    • The speaker clarified that peak traffic was usually experienced during the middle of the day, at around 2pm.
    • There was a question about the ratio of international to domestic traffic at the exchange. The speaker explained that the exchange has domestic peers only.
    • The speaker was asked about collocation facilities within WAIX. The speaker noted that WAIX had none, but there are other collocation facilities in the same building at WAIX.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  7. Introduction and status update for the LINX

  8. Vanessa Evans, LINX

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation was an introduction to the LINX, which is an exchange point outside the AP region. The presenter explained the history of the exchange and its current operations. Currently, the exchange has 144 members and is experiencing a linear growth in members. The exchange traffic currently peaks at 36Gbps. LINX has hosted the K-Root for 7 years and now hosts a collector for the RIPE NCC Routing Information Service. The speaker stated that LINX will soon be deploying Foundry MG8 for their next generation switch fabric. It was explained that LINX operates a flat fee structure for its members to make it fair for all participants; the more participants are involved, the lower the fees for all participants. The speaker noted that LINX currently provides 100Mb/1Gb ports and provision of rack space in LINX's own space. Future improvements for LINX include planning for DDOS protection, DNS caching, and bringing a 10Gb port online. Service from Asia from is provided by Flag Telecom.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was noted that organisations must become members to take advantage of LINX services.
    • The speaker clarified that DDOS protection would be provided by Riverhead.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  9. Introduction and status update for the Euro-IX

  10. Serge Radovcic, Euro-IX

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter clarified that Euro-IX is not an IX, but an association of European Internet Exchanges. Euro-IX was established in 2001 as a central point for the exchange of information between IXs. Euro-IX provides the public with information on IXPs via the Euro-IX website. For IXPs, Euro-IX lists prospective peering partners via an ASN database that currently lists 1450 ASNs. Euro-IX also provides access to an IXP matrix for ISPs to use. The speaker explained that there is currently one staff member in the Euro-IX Secretariat, with a second staff member, a regulatory officer to help explain legal issues that may affect members, starting soon. Euro-IX maintains a switch database for members and a staff exchange facility for IXs that are willing to help other IXs. The presenter explained that Euro-IX used to hold meetings with RIPE, but due to too many conflicts between sessions, Euro-IX now holds its meetings separately. The speaker outlined the minimum criteria for joining Euro-IX and offered any AP IXs free entry to Euro-IX forums.

    Questions and discussion

    • The speaker clarified that the regulatory officer would focus on EU law, as most members are inside the EU region, but if laws outside the region would also affect member operations, those laws would also be examined.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  11. JPNAP update

  12. Toshinori Ishii, Internet Multifeed Co

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation explained that JPNAP is a commercial IX in Japan with three services: JPNAP, JPNAP6 and JPNAP Osaka. The speaker provided an overview of JPNAP, which is an Ethernet-based Layer 2 IX with distributed IX service providing 10Gbps service for six users on 10 ports. The speaker explained that some users use more than one 10Gbps port. The presented noted that JPNAP Osaka also has a 10Gbps service available. JPNAP currently has a peak of 5Gbps. The speaker's overview of JPNAP Osaka noted that it is not connected to the JPNAP service; this is done to provide redundancy in case of a disaster in Tokyo. The speaker commented that after two P2P individuals were arrested for copyright piracy by Japanese police, peak traffic reduced by 6Gbps.

    The speaker noted that JPNAP6 is not dual stacked.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a comment that it was hard to believe that two users could generate 6Gbps traffic. The speaker acknowledged that he didn't know why the reduction in traffic coincided with the arrest and that they were not necessarily linked.
    • The speaker clarified that only JPNAP and JPNAP6 were connected and that JPNAP Osaka was separate from the Tokyo exchanges.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

  13. IIX (Indonesian Internet eXchange) status report

  14. Johar Alam, APJII

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation gave an overview of the development of IIX, which was initiated in 1997, noting that Indonet was the first ISP in Indonesia and RadNet was the first licensed ISP. Due to a crippling exchange rate in 1997, there was a crisis for Indonesian ISPs, who had previously connected to San Francisco.

    The speaker explained that because the first node of IIX is at full capacity, a new node was built at the Data Center, with all routers physically moved to the new location. The presenter explained that international carriers have also moved to the same location, followed by the local telco, which has resulted in connections now available at 100Mbps.

    Peak traffic experienced at the exchange this year was 1.2Gbps between 11 am and 1 pm.

    IIX is administered by three staff.

    The IIX uses an IP address block never announced outside Indonesia. The IIX uses BGP4 as well as static routing.

    The speaker summarised the growth in traffic from 1997 to 2004.

    Questions and discussion

    • The speaker clarified that the hardware in the IX consisted of a Cisco router 7204. IIX cascaded switches in a single subnet to get the switching system started, which reduced the router load from 80% to 20%.

    Action items

    • None.

    Top

Minutes


 
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