Minutes

APNIC Member Meeting (and AC election)

Friday 3 September 2004, Sheraton Fiji Resort, Nadi, Fiji

Meeting commenced: 9:05 am

Chair: Paul Wilson

The Chair opened the APNIC Member Meeting, noting that it could be described as an "Open Members' Meeting" as it is open to all interested people. He thanked the sponsors, Telecom Fiji, Connect, and CNC (Gold sponsors) and CNNIC, KRNIC, and TWNIC (Silver sponsor). The Chair reminded attendees of the meeting resources and archives available on the web site. He then explained the agenda and asked for comments or suggestions for any other agenda items.

Contents

    Status reports

  1. APNIC update and financial report
  2. APNIC Executive Council report
  3. APNIC Stakeholder and Member Survey
  4. RIR reports

  5. ARIN report
  6. LACNIC report
  7. RIPE NCC report
  8. Open microphone session
  9. Report on the ASO AC
  10. ICANN/NRO status reports

  11. Number Resource Organization (NRO) update
  12. ASO update
  13. WSIS update
  14. SIG reports

  15. Address Policy SIG
  16. Database SIG
  17. DNS operations SIG
  18. IPv6 Technical SIG
  19. NIR SIG
  20. Routing SIG
  21. IX SIG
  22. BoFs reports

  23. APOPs
  24. NIR training BoF
  25. NIR policy process BoF
  26. NIR systems BoF
  27. Open microphone session
  28. Next meetings
  29. Other business

    Status reports

  1. APNIC update and financial report

  2. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation reported the current status and activities of the APNIC Secretariat. The total membership is now approaching 900. The membership tier structure was explained. The distribution of members among the economies of the region has changed over time. The economy which is growing most steadily in terms of membership is Australia. There are also many economies with one, two, or three members in them. APNIC has never gone into negative membership growth, even throughout the dotcom crash. The budget contains fairly confident projections of membership growth.

    IPv4 address allocation is accelerating in this region. APNIC now holds 12 /8 blocks. The most recently allocated blocks are 59 and 60. The majority of the allocations are in Japan and Mainland China. The "other" category, which accounts for approximately 40 economies, holds a relatively small amount of IPv4 address space. The presenter noted that the statistics expose the myth of China holding less than a /8. The presenter noted that in the last four years, APNIC has been allocating more IPv4 addresses than the other RIRs.

    On the other hand, ASN allocation rates in this region are quite low and also appear to be slowing down. Korea and Japan hold the majority of ASNs in this region. It was noted that Mainland China has a small number of quite large networks, so their ASN holdings are low.

    The presenter discussed the rate of Whois queries. APNIC introduced rate limiting in recent years as the usage of Whois was beginning to cause concern. APNIC allows access to bulk whois data subject to an acceptable use policy.

    There are now 43 staff in the Secretariat. Staff growth is slowing down as efficiencies are increasing.

    The Helpdesk operates a one day turnaround on telephone and email. This is assisted by the success of MyAPNIC. The presenter also noted the MyAPNIC demonstration that is available, which was entirely produced by APNIC staff. There are plans to introduce VoIP to the APNIC phone system to improve access to the Helpdesk. The Helpdesk times will be extended to provide more support for South Asia. There are also plans to provide more ISP support information on the web site.

    The Secretariat has appointed a second area liaison officer, this time for the South Asia area. This follows the work of the area liaison officer for the Pacific Islands.

    The latest issue of Apster is available now. Apster is not targeted specifically for the membership. It is intended to be of broader interest to the community. There are translated brochures available. Translations of the Annual Report will be available soon. There are also ongoing liaison activities with bodies such as the IETF and the IAB.

    The presenter displayed a map illustrating APNIC's work in establishing F, I, and K root server instances in the region.

    MyAPNIC development is ongoing. Some of the development is necessary to implement policy changes, other developments are extensions of functionality and performance. The certification systems have been upgraded, partly in anticipation of future certification of resource holding, which will be used to boost routing security.

    APNIC has developed its own event registration system, which has also been provided to APRICOT, APAN, SANOG, and other AP organisations.

    There has been some additional service provisioning and upgrades in the Secretariat office. There has also been considerable work ongoing in the ERX project. Much other technical work is carried on to implement policy changes.

    APNIC training services have been expanded. There are now three core courses, as well as DNS workshops, IRR tutorials, and there is development in technical aspects of IPv6 and in routing. To date in 2004, there have been approximately 30 sessions across the region. This represents a considerable increase in the training frequency since 2003. The feedback on training is consistently high, as is feedback on the need for training.

    Regular features of APNIC meetings now include multicast and webcast, translation (where needed), real time transcription, and jabber chat. APNIC has participated in meetings in other venues, in conjunction with APRICOT and SANOG. Other developments in the meetings include the Policy Lunch, the Newcomers' Breakfast, and Fellowships. At this meeting, there was a CEOs' Meeting to encourage more high-level participation and increase the awareness of the meeting for the staff of LIRs.

    There are 161 registrations for this meeting, with a total attendance of 138, and attendance for the AMM of 102. The attendance levels are very high in comparison with other APNIC meetings. It was noted that there was good representation from right across the region. The presenter showed breakdowns of the attendance by industry sector and role.

    APNIC's budget was updated mid-year with the consent of the APNIC EC. APNIC is currently running about 4.4 percent below budget. APNIC is operating conservatively and expects a balanced budget at the end of the year. There is a lot of fluctuation in US/AU exchange rates, with has a strong effect on the APNIC budget. The financial position, year-to-date, is very stable, about the same as at the end of last year.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  3. APNIC Executive Council report

  4. Akinori Maemura, EC Chair

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This report summarised the recent activities of the APNIC EC. The presenter introduced the members of the Executive Council. EC terms are two years and the office holders on the EC are elected for one year.

    He noted the meetings that have been held to date in 2004, including seven teleconferences and two face-to-face meetings.

    One of the roles of the EC is to endorse policy proposals that reach consensus through the policy development process. The presenter noted the policies endorsed since APNIC 17.

    The EC has been involved in the ASO Address Council transition plan. The presenter noted that due to the progress of the new ASO MoU, the EC decided to postpone the scheduled AC election until APNIC 19. The current AC member, Kenny Huang, will continue to serve in that role until then.

    The EC receives monthly financial reports from the Secretariat and confirms the Annual Financial Report. This year, the EC has begun receiving the monthly reports in AU dollars to better understand the financial position.

    The EC has been considering the use of online voting for future APNIC meetings, as this feature is now available in MyAPNIC.

    The minutes of all EC meetings are available on the APNIC web site.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  5. APNIC Stakeholder and Member Survey

  6. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation is a brief summary of the detailed survey report conducted and prepared by KPMG. This report will be used by the Secretariat for the next two years to plan activities and service improvements.

    This and previous surveys are conducted independently by KPMG, with a guarantee of confidentiality. Surveys have now been conducted in 1999, 2001, and 2004. The most recent survey received 245 responses from 27 economies. Previous surveys have included considerable face-to-face consultations across the region. Now, to gain more detailed information, this survey was done by way of a written form. The forms were tested on focus groups and revised substantially before being sent out to the broader community. All survey materials are available on the APNIC web site.

    The first section of the survey dealt with assessment of present services. The rating was given as a score from one to 10. The average rating was 6.8, with a standard deviation of 0.5.

    The second section related to assessment of priority for APNIC to allocate resources in future. The average rating was 7.2, with a standard deviation of 0.7.

    The presenter reviewed the positively rated aspects of services and activities. Full details are available in the presentation and the report itself. The highest rated area related to APNIC evaluating needs for additional training courses. Training on policy issues was also highly rated. There was also a strong call for simpler policies. The accuracy and usability of APNIC database services was rated highly. Thee was a high rating for APNIC's role in root server installation, but not for APNIC to become a root server operator.

    The services which received the most negative ratings were also reviewed. The most negative response shows that members do not want APNIC to increase fees to support new services. There were also negative responses in relation to the time taken to develop policy changes, ease of participation in the policy development process, and ease of applying for resources. The survey received negative a negative response on whether Apster meets members needs. It was suggested this may have been related to the fact that Apster is not intended to be specifically for members only. There was also a negative rating for the acceptability of the current fee structure.

    It was suggested that more analysis is required to make the most of these results.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a comment that there is a lack of parity in the membership fee structure between developing and developed countries. It was suggested that there should be, not necessarily a cheaper fee structure overall, but at least a more fair distribution of fees across different parts of the region. It was noted that this issue has been raised before. To implement such suggestions would require a formal proposal and membership vote. It was also noted that to lower fees for some parts of the region, would mean raising it in others.

    [Break 10:15 - 10:50 am]

    The Chair resumed the meeting and introduced the stenographers, inviting any interested participants to speak to the stenographers in the break for a demonstration of their system.

    Top

    RIR reports

  7. ARIN report

  8. Ray Plzak, ARIN

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and current resource status of ARIN.

    The presenter described the structure of ARIN and explained how decisions are made. He noted that ARIN has recently altered its internal structure to include a Director of Operations, with an internal focus, and a Director of External Relations, who enables ARIN to participate in more diverse external forums than were possible previously.

    Membership growth in ARIN has been steady. There are now 2,147 members, including some non-resource members outside the ARIN region.

    ARIN performs approximately 40,000 re-assignment requests each month, which is the dominant activity. The presenter noted the other main areas of hostmaster activity.

    ARIN has commenced developing a three year activity road map, for extended planning. This helps in long term budget planning, workload forecasting, and risk management.

    ARIN is bringing all policies together into the ARIN Internet Number Resource Policy Manual, to provide better referencing, change management, historical tracking, and a cross reference system. There is also a glossary in development.

    ARIN is very active in the AfriNIC transition.

    ARIN has never conducted comprehensive surveys. It has taken the approach of conducting targeted surveys, by sending the Director of External Relations to seek the feedback of the certain audiences that ARIN is seeking to reach out to, as well as attendees at ARIN and NANOG meetings.

    The presenter briefly reviewed a list of technical and administrative activities that are currently ongoing.

    ARIN does not conduct training sessions across the region. It presents tutorials at ARIN meetings and uses computer based training (CBT) materials. The Whois CBT course was used by more than 12,000 participants in 2003. ARIN has found these materials to be very effective.

    The presenter reported on web site statistics, noting that the vast majority of hits on the web site are for Whois queries. It was reported that there appears to be a considerable amount of data mining activity.

    ARIN currently has one seat open for election on the ASO AC, two on the Board of Trustees, and five on the Advisory Council.

    The presenter reviewed the progress of policy development in the ARIN region. Full details are available in the presentation.

    ARIN is an active participant in the NRO, ASO MoU work, and the WSIS process.

    The presenter described the AfriNIC activities, including document reviews, policy development, co-evaluation of requests, support for the AfriNIC Board meetings, and participation in AfriNIC meetings.

    The next ARIN meeting will be held back-to-back with NANOG from October 20 in Reston, Virginia.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  9. LACNIC report

  10. Ray Plzak, ARIN (on behalf of Ra'l Echeberr'a, LACNIC)

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and resource status of LACNIC.

    LACNIC's financial position is such that their income consistently exceeds their expenses. However, the initial high levels of support from NIC Mexico and NIC Brasil will soon be completed. LACNIC must be completely self-sustaining from 1 January 2005. LACNIC has established a Finance Review Committee, comprising people elected from the region.

    Membership continues to grow. NIC Mexico and NIC Brasil are similar to NIRs in the APNIC region. Members of those bodies are gradually being absorbed into the LACNIC membership.

    The presentation contained details of membership growth and resource distribution across the region.

    LACNIC has held training activities in nine locations sine the start of 2003.

    LACNIC VI was held recently in Montevideo. It was very well attended and included meetings of several other organisations. A Latin American IPv6 task Force was created at that meeting. LACNIC also has a new Policy Development Process.

    LACNIC has signed an agreement to facilitate several instances of the F-root server in several locations across the region.

    LACNIC is working on establishing an IRR.

    LACNIC continues to participate on the FRIDA program, which provides ICT R&D funding in the region.

    LACNIC is working hard to improve contact information with ASN holders. This has helped raise much awareness of LACNIC and its activities.

    LACNIC VII will be held in late October in San Jos', Costa Rica.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  11. RIPE NCC report

  12. Axel Pawlik, RIPE NCC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and resource status of RIPE NCC.

    RIPE NCC is continuously updating its policy development process to create a more structured process and improve the ability to track the progress of policies.

    RIPE NCC has implemented a /21 minimum IPv4 allocation policy. RIPE NCC has also implemented a special /22 minimum allocation policy for members in the AfriNIC region.

    Registration services have been improved by the introduction of the LIR portal.

    RIPE NCC will conduct approximately 65 training courses in 2004 and is investigating new methods for delivering training. RIPE NCC is collaborating with APNIC in some of these developments.

    RIPE NCC has introduced regional meetings as a membership liaison initiative, which have been successful in receiving feedback on local issues and government perspectives. More of these meetings are planned for Russia and the Middle East in the near future.

    RIPE NCC has changed its meeting frequency. There are now two general meetings, one of which includes a members' meeting. The members now decide on the charging scheme only, although this is closely related to the activity plan.

    RIPE NCC expects membership growth of 11 percent this year. Fees will be reduced by about 10 percent in the next budget, subject to membership approval.

    The next RIPE meeting will be held in Manchester, UK, from 20 September 2004.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  13. Open microphone discussion

  14. The Chair invited contributions from the participants on any matter they wish to discuss.

    • There was a comment received via Jabber that there is a need for small allocations to small economies, such as those in the Pacific Islands. It was noted that the recent lowering of the minimum allocation is a good thing. The suggestion was to allow even smaller allocations in economies which have populations of less than 500,000. The Chair noted that, as was the case in ARIN and RIPE NCC, the APNIC EC has approved a special policy modification, allowing /22 allocations to members from economies that will soon be within the AfriNIC region. It was noted that the EC, in making this decision outside the regular policy development process, noted the likelihood that no, or at least very few, such allocations would actually be made. It was noted that for such a policy to be more broadly applied to the region, it would require a formal proposal. It was also noted, particularly in relation to IPv6, that it is more relevant to consider the eligibility criteria rather than the minimum allocation.

    • There was a question about the availability of online voting. It was noted that the issue has some complications that need to be considered. The next member meeting will be held in February 2005 and will include a vote for the EC election. It was noted that there is a good chance that online voting could be used for that meeting, although it will be necessary to first verify that the system is sufficiently reliable and secure. It was also clarified that the online voting system will be for formal membership votes. General policy consensus, on the other hand, is not subject to formal votes. Consensus is established in the meetings and on the mailing lists, therefore, there are already online mechanisms for policy matters. It was also noted that there is already remote voting available through the proxy system.

    Top

  15. Report on the ASO AC

  16. Kenny Huang, ASO AC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter described the role and functions of the ASO Address Council. He explained the composition of the AC, including the observers. He noted that Raimundo Beca has resigned from the AC, since his appointment to the ICANN Board. This position is still to be filled.

    The AC has appointed the following ICANN Board members: Mouhamet Diop and Raimundo Beca.

    The presenter noted the ASO General Assembly, which was held in Amsterdam in May, in conjunction with the RIPE meeting.

    The presenter reviewed the activities of the ASO AC, full details of which are available in the presentation. The AC is currently working with the RIRs on completing the ICANN reform negotiations, which will change the structure of the ASO.

    In their most recent meeting, the AC endorsed the policy, developed through the RIR regions, for IANA to RIR IPv4 allocations.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

    ICANN/NRO status reports

  17. Number Resource Organization (NRO) update

  18. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter displayed the NRO logo, which was designed by APNIC's Chiaki Kanno. He noted that the logo represents the existing RIRs and the emerging RIR, AfriNIC.

    The NRO is a coalition of the RIRs, designed as an ongoing carriage of joint RIR activities. This includes technical coordination and services, a joint RIR point of contact, global policy coordination, and negotiioan with other bodies (such as ICANN, IETF, and UN/ITU/WSIS).

    The NRO is independent of ICANN and is able to work with or without ICANN. It was established by an Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in October 2003. This followed an intense period of public comment and review. The NRO is not yet incorporated, although this is currently being investigated.

    There is a defined policy development process within the NRO structure, via the NRO Number Council. This structure is not currently active. It is to be considered as a placeholder for possible future use, if the NRO was required to operate without the existence of ICANN. Previously, if ICANN and IANA had failed, there was no process to continue the address allocation function. The NRO NC is designed to fill this gap if it ever arises.

    The presenter explained the NRO structure and the relationship it has to the RIRs and ICANN.

    The NRO Executive Council (EC) is now active and coordination groups have been formed for engineering and communications activities. The NRO web site has been launched.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  19. ASO update

  20. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    The presenter reviewed the background, structure, and operations of the ASO.

    The RIRs have held concerns about the effectiveness of the ASO, so have been negotiating with ICANN to develop a new ASO. These negotiations are nearly complete. ICANN had provided the NRO with a letter of intent to sign the proposed new ASO Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

    Under the proposed ASO MoU, the new ASO would be established by the NRO to provide a policy coordination structure. This will follow a defined 15-step process, described in an annex to the proposed ASO MoU. The ASO will continue to have an Address Council (AC), with three members from each region, two elected, one appointed by the RIRs. The RIR appointments are intended to ensure that there is sufficient direct representation of RIR concerns.

    Subject to the comment periods which were undertaken, the NRO and ICANN had agreed to sign the MoU at the next opportunity, which was to be the ICANN meeting in Kuala Lumpur in May 2004. Unfortunately, at that meeting the ICANN Board did not include this item on their formal agenda, so the ASO MoU was not signed.

    The RIRs understand that some Government Advisory Committee (GAC) members had concerns which were notified to the ICANN Board. The difficult position of the RIR Boards is that there has been a lack of formal communication about the concerns of the GAC and the ICANN Board members.

    The RIRs have continued to pay funds to ICANN, despite the lack of a service agreement or new MoU. The RIRs have collectively paid 50 percent of the fees currently due. There is a now a proposal from the NRO to pay some more of the accrued fees, with the balance to be paid upon signing of the service contracts. It was noted that the fees have risen, with the new fees for APNIC approximately double what was budgeted.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  21. WSIS update

  22. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    The presenter described the intention of the World Summit on the Information Society, which is a two-stage, intergovernmental UN summit focussing on ICT issues, with a particular reference to the needs of developing nations.

    Participation is limited to government representatives and officially accredited bodies. Accreditation to attend does not generally allow access to special drafting sessions and other special interest groups.

    There are many meetings to determine what will be said, as there are strict limits on the time allowed to each representative.

    APNIC has been accredited to attend.

    There were five major preparatory meetings leading up to the first phase of the Summit in Geneva in late 2002 to early 2003. The plan of action developed called for a Working Group on Internet Governance (WGIG). The WGIG is tasked to define what Internet Governance actually is. The presenter noted that the topic of Internet governance is subject to many different interpretations, covering a broad range of different functions. Some extreme views represented in the WSIS would have the ICANN functions totally absorbed into the ITU.

    What happens after WSIS is still to be determined. It is possible that a five-year cycle could be established after WSIS Phase II.

    The presenter reviewed the plan for Phase II. He noted that it has been agreed that documents that came out of Phase I would be accepted into Phase II without further review. There is another Preparatory Conference to be held in Tunisia in 2005, with the next Summit to be held the following year.

    APNIC has attended five meetings to date. APNIC recognises the potential impacts on Internet addressing, especially in relation to the stability of the policy making process.

    Responses are required from RIRs, ICANN, and others and there is a need for more engagement at government level. APNIC will continue working with all relevant parties.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    [Break 12:35pm - 2:00pm]

    Top

    SIG reports

    The Chair described the role of the AMM in reviewing the reports and recommendations arising from the SIGs. He also reviewed the requirements of the policy development process.

  23. Address Policy SIG

  24. Takashi Arano, iNetcore

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter thanked the SIG co-chairs for their assistance and noted the good SIG attendance. He announced that Toshiyuki Hosaka had been elected as the new co-chair of this SIG.

    He then reviewed the consensus items and recommended actions arising from the SIG.

    (prop-023-v001) A proposal to prevent the routing of "dark" address space
    This was a proposal to withdraw address space from LIRs which route "dark" address space. It was explained that many concerns were voiced about the technical and procedural difficulties this would raise. There was no consensus to adopt this proposal.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    (prop-020-v001) HD ratio for IPv4 allocations
    This was a proposal to use the HD ratio to determine the utilisation threshold for IPv4 allocations. It was noted that there had been a lot of discussion but no clear consensus on the proposal. As an alternative, the SIG reached consensus to keep the proposal open, but to request the Secretariat, with the assistance of the NIRs, to conduct a survey of ISP address management problems, to allow better analysis of this issue.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    (prop-021-v001) Expansion of the initial allocation space for existing IPv6 address space holders
    This was a proposal to allow existing IPv6 address holders to expand their initial allocation, using their existing IPv4 infrastructure to justify an allocation larger than a /32. The use of IPv4 infrastructure to justify a larger initial allocation was passed at APNIC 17 (prop-016-v002). This current proposal allows networks that received an initial allocation before prop-0160-v002 to be given the same opportunity to receive an initial allocation greater than /32. It was noted that the SIG reached consensus to adopt this proposal.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a question about how many times a single requestor could use this proposed policy to expand their initial allocation. It was noted that the way this proposal had been expressed needed to be clarified. It was clarified that the expansion allowed would be based on the existing IPv4 infrastructure.
    • The Chair sought a show of hands on this proposal.
    • The Chair noted consensus to adopt this proposal.

    (prop-005-v004) IANA IPv6 global allocation policy
    This was a proposal about how IANA should allocate IPv6 address space to the RIRs. It was reported that there had been a lot of discussion surrounding this proposal, resulting in a number of amendments. The SIG reached consensus to adopt the general framework of the proposal, noting flexibility was required in relation to the specific details, which would also need to be discussed in the other regions.

    It was decided that the AMM did not need to discuss this proposal extensively, as the consensus of the SIG was to keep the proposal alive, but make a final decision on the detail subject to more discussion.

    Questions and discussion

    • The Chair of the meeting emphasised that there would be a period on the mailing list to further discuss this policy, should the AMM agree with the SIG consensus.
    • The Chair sought a show of hands on this proposal.
    • The Chair noted consensus to adopt this proposal.

    General discussion

    • There was a comment received via Jabber chat from Franck Martin thanking APNIC for having its meeting in the Pacific and Connect for making it possible. He also noted that he looked forward to future collaboration with APNIC.

    Top

  25. Database SIG

  26. Xing Li, CERNET

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter reviewed the consensus items and recommended actions arising from the SIG. There were no policy proposals in this SIG. The presenter briefly described the issues discussed at the SIG, including:

    • an update of the project to provide privacy for customer assignment records;
    • an update of the project to protect historical records in the APNIC Whois database;
    • modification of the Whois domain object authorisation;
    • recent updates to the RIPE database software; and
    • a proposal for an APNIC IPv6 IRR service.

    (prop-025-v001) Proposal for an APNIC IPv6 IRR service It was reported that the DB SIG had adopted in principle the proposal for the APNIC Secretariat to develop an IPv6 IRR service, but that it had been decided that the specific details of the service would still need to be determined.

    Questions and discussion

    • The Chair sought a show of hands on the IPv6 IRR proposal.
    • The Chair noted consensus to adopt this proposal.

    Top

  27. DNS operations

  28. Joe Abley, ISC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The SIG Chair noted that there had been 70 people in attendance at the meeting. There were no policy proposals. The Chair also noted that there was one open action item, regarding the Secretariat's clean-up of lame delegations in the Whois Database. The SIG Chair described the informational presentations, including:

    • APNIC nameserver load;
    • Lame delegations;
    • DNS generation system;
    • Root server coordination;
    • IPv6 transport for IN-ADDR.ARPA zone;
    • DNSSec deployment;
    • Root zone IPv6 Glue records.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  29. IPv6 technical SIG

  30. Kazu Yamamoto, IIJ

    The SIG Chair provided a summary of the IPv6 SIG, noting that there had been seven presentations by six people. The presentations were all informational, including:

    • IPv6 allocation status report;
    • IPv6 /48 assignment status report;
    • Guidelines for ISPs on IPv6 assignment to customers;
    • An update on operational recommendations for IPv6 for TLD and other servers;
    • IPv6 .kr DNS deployment in Korea;
    • Update on multihoming solutions from IETF;
    • Deployment plans behind larger IPv6 allocations.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  31. NIR SIG

  32. Maemura Akinori, JPNIC IP Department

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The SIG Chair reviewed the history of the NIR structure and the NIR SIG. He explained the agenda for this meeting and noted that there were 20 attendees, representing all NIRs and APNIC. The speaker also announced the appointment of two new chairs, David Chen from TWNIC and Izumi Okutani from JPNIC.

    The Chair noted that there were two policy proposals.

    (prop-022-v001) A proposal to abolish redundant charges in IPv6 allocations
    The speaker noted that this was a proposal to revise the method of calculating IPv6 per-address fee so that multiple fees charged for the same address range will be abolished. This proposal reached consensus.

    Questions and discussion

    • The Chair noted that traditionally changes to the fee structure have gone to a formal full member vote. He suggested that in this case there had not been sufficient notice to prepare a formal vote, but that if consensus was achieved through the normal procedures, the APNIC EC would then be able to decide on whether to accept this change, in their position as member representatives.
    • There was a request to clarify the differences between the old and proposed structures. The Chair explained that, in the case of IPv4, there was a simple formula where the number of addresses in the block allocated is calculated and the fee is applied per-address. In the case of IPv6, every allocation of IPv6 is, in theory, an expansion of a previous allocation and for every allocation made the entire number of addresses in the whole prefix is calculated again, even if that prefix encloses a previously allocated prefix for which charges have already been paid. This can lead to a double charging that is arguably unfair and inconsistent with the per-address fee structure imposed for other allocations.
    • It was noted that what is being paid for is the service rather than the address space itself.
    • Examples were presented showing the effect of the current fee structure.
    • It was clarified that per-address fees apply to members of NIRs, but not to conventional APNIC members.
    • The presenter noted that under the current structure LIRs which obtain a large initial allocation through an NIR will pay a much lower amount than an LIR which starts with a smaller allocation from the NIR and then expands that.
    • The Chair sought a show of hands on the proposal to revise the method of calculating IPv6 per-address fee.
    • The Chair noted consensus to adopt this proposal.

    (prop-024-v001) Proposal to change the NIR fee structure by applying an upper limit on per address fee
    The presenter explained that this was a proposal to apply a cap to the one-off per-address fee applied to NIR members, as it was perceived as being unfair to those seeking very large allocations. The presenter noted, by way of example, that in the case of a /13 IPv4 allocation, the per-address fee is equivalent to the annual fee for standard members, but that in the case of a /13 allocation, the per-address fee is four times higher than the annual fee for standard members. It was noted that the discussion of this proposal had included issues of fairness and concerns about the potential impact of the proposal on APNIC's financial position.

    The presenter noted that no consensus was reached on the proposal, but that there had been consensus to form a working group to conduct a fundamental review of the entire NIR fee structure.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Finally, the presenter noted that due to lengthy discussions on the proposals, there was not sufficient time left in the SIG to hear the other informational presentations in full.

    Top

  33. Routing SIG

  34. Philip Smith, Cisco

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter noted that there were four informational presentations on the agenda for this SIG, and reported that there were approximately 50 attendees.

    The informational reports were:

    • BGP wedgies: bad routing policy interactions which cannot be debugged;
    • Happy packets: some initial results & BGP is chattier than you think;
    • IPv6 routing status report;
    • BGP status report and BGP: The Movie.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  35. IX SIG

  36. Philip Smith, Cisco

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter explained the SIG agenda and noted that the SIG was attended by 30 people. The SIG Chair described the informational presentations, including:

    • An update on JPNAP;
    • A presentation containing updates on BDIX, NPIX, NIXI, VNIX.

    He also noted a number of the discussions held in the SIG, including discussion of a comprehensive list of IXes in the region that could be used to build filters, and whether IPv6 address blocks could be assigned to IXes when they receive their IPv4 address block.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

    BoFs reports

  37. APOPs

  38. Philip Smith, Cisco

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The presenter described the role of the APOPs BOF. He noted that it is a forum for operators in the region to meet and discuss topics of common interest. He noted that APNIC hosts a web site for APOPs. He encouraged subscription to the discussion list. He also noted that there were approximately 20 attendees.

    The BOF featured updates from Kazu Yamamoto, Randy Bush, and Guarab Raj Upadhaya, covering topics such as IPv6 deployment issues, the tension between innovative Internet and security, and the recent SANOG meeting.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  39. NIR training BoF

  40. John Hng, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The BOF coordinator explained the purpose of the NIR training BOF, an informal meeting motivated by some successful collaborative training sessions organised with the NIRs at past meetings. The BOF was an opportunity to share experiences and determine whether there was any merit to setting up a working group between training coordinators from the different NIRs. The outcome was that there was no need to set up a working group, and that discussion via a mailing list was preferred.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  41. NIR policy process BoF

  42. Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    Top

  43. NIR systems BoF

  44. Izumi, JPNIC

    Presentation [pdf | ppt]

    The speaker explained the purpose of the BOF, which was a chance to exchange information about the various policy processes in the different NIRs. The session attracted 15 participants. The speaker noted that the policy processes are quite diverse, and that some NIRs do not yet hold OPMs, but are focused on implementing APNIC policies, while some of the larger NIRs do hold OPMs. The speaker noted that there were common concerns regarding community participation, whether in terms of comments or policy proposals. There was also shared concern among the NIRs regarding how to project their constituents concerns into the APNIC policy forum.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

    The Chair clarified the purpose of the BOF format, and encouraged attendees who would like to arrange their own BOFs to do so.

    Top

  45. Open microphone session

  46. The Chair invited any questions or comments from the floor. There were none.

    Top

  47. Next meetings

  48. A representative of SANOG noted that the next SANOG would be in Dhaka, Bangladesh from 6 to 20 February 2005, and the following SANOG would be Thimphu, Bhutan, 16 to 23 July 2005. The speaker encouraged APNIC attendees to attend SANOG meetings.

    The Chair announced that the next APNIC meting would be held in Kyoto, Japan in February 2005 in conjunction with APRICOT 2005.

    The Chair also announced that proposals were now open for the APNIC meeting in 2005, and that the APNIC 21 meeting would be in Bangalore, India.

    Questions and discussion

    Top

  49. Other business

  50. The Chair thanked CNC, the Gold sponsor for this meeting and CNNIC, KRNIC, and TWNIC as Silver sponsors. He presented gifts to representatives of those organisations.

    The Chair also thanked Connect and Fiji telecom as meeting hosts and special Gold Sponsors. He presented gifts to their representatives.

    The Chair then thanked ITU-T, Softbank BB, Fintel, Transtel, and Xceed Pasifika, and Internet New Zealand.

    The Chair also thanked the SIG Chairs, the guest trainers, the captioning staff, the visiting RIR staff, and the APNIC staff for the smooth operation of the meeting. The Chair thanked all those who attended the meeting, numbering approximately 130.

    The Chair also thanked Fiji Telecom for doing such a good job as the meeting host.

    Maemura-san extended an invitation to APRICOT, noting that the event would celebrate 10 years since the beginning of APRICOT, as well as the leading role that Asian economies have taken in Internet technology.

    Finally, the staff of the Sheraton Fiji Resort sang a farewell song for the meeting attendees.

    Questions and discussion

    • None

Meeting closed: 4:00 pm

Minuted by: Gerard Ross & Chris Buckridge

Top

Open action items

  • None.

Minutes | APNIC Member Meeting


Top of page
Programme | SIGs | HM consultation | Social events | Sponsorship | APNIC meetings | APNIC 18 home | APNIC home
Last modified: Monday, 14-Mar-2016 10:52:32 EST | © 1999 - 2021 APNIC Pty. Ltd.
Contact us | Privacy statement