APRICOT 2006

APNIC Member Meeting

Minutes

Wednesday 1 March 2006, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre (PCEC), Perth, Australia

Meeting commenced: 9:00 am

Chair: Paul Wilson

The Chair opened the APNIC Member Meeting and explained the agenda. He thanked the sponsors, TWNIC, CNNIC, JPNIC, and KRNIC of NIDA, which are all Silver Sponsors for this meeting. He then explained the voting procedures for the EC election. The Chair then invited suggested for any additions to the agenda.

Contents

  1. Welcome, APNIC status, and financial report
  2. APNIC Executive Council report
  3. APNIC fee structure
  4. Joint statistics
  5. AfriNIC report
  6. ARIN report
  7. LACNIC report
  8. RIPE NCC report
  9. IANA report
  10. Election procedure
  11. Report on the ASO AC
  12. Database SIG
  13. DNS operations SIG report
  14. NIR SIG report
  15. IPv6 Technical SIG
  16. Policy SIG report
  17. IX SIG
  18. Routing SIG report
  19. Suggested new format for APNIC Open Policy Meeting
  20. APOPs & ICONS
  21. PGP key signing BoF
  22. Open microphone discussion
  23. Lucky draw
  24. NRO & WSIS review: way forward
  25. EC election result
  26. Open microphone discussion
  27. Next meeting
  28. Other business
  1. Welcome, APNIC status, and financial report

  2. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation reported the current status and activities of the APNIC Secretariat. The Secretariat now has 46 staff members, representing nearly 20 nationalities and languages.

    In 2005, the Secretariat launched the "Clients First" project to continually improve services, simplify procedures, and use feedback from the community to improve the way people can interact with APNIC. One of the results of this project is the VoIP service that is now available and includes a SIP URL to the helpdesk. MyAPNIC has been undergoing continuous development. It now supports online voting, such as the EC election at this meeting. MyAPNIC performance has also been boosted, especially in low bandwidth environments. Helpdesk hours have also been extended and a live chat service has been added to the Helpdesk.

    There is a lot of work ongoing relating to resource certification, based on the RFC 3779 model. A trial of the resource certification practices began in 2005 and there are plans to make this a public service in 2006. There is research ongoing to prepare for a transition to 4-byte ASNs. There is much other research and development output appearing on the Potaroo web site. APNIC continues to support the Pan Asia ICT R&D grants.

    APNIC had 1,157 members at the end of 2005, which saw the largest membership growth since 2000. The presenter displayed a chart of the membership distribution. The economies with the largest memberships are Australia, India, and Hong Kong, although the NIR countries also represent a great deal of activity.

    The presenter reviewed the policy developments of 2005, noting the IANA global IPv6 allocation policy, which is in the final stages of global coordination. He also noted the other proposals that passed in 2005, relating to reporting of assignment statistics, extension of the large space trial in Japan, deprecation of ip6.int, and changes to the IPv6 allocation policy.

    APNIC has been trying to take a more business-like approach to training services in order to make APNIC's training resources more easily available. There has been expansion of the APNIC training materials, including routing, DNS, and IPv6. There were 34 training sessions delivered in 22 economies in 2005. APNIC has also now appointed a new eLearning Development Officer, to implement an online training program.

    APNIC technical infrastructure has been improving. The Secretariat has co-located all of its critical services. Greylisting has reduced the impact of spam. There has also been a project to clean up lame reverse DNS delegations.

    APNIC continued to support root server deployments in the region during 2005. There are now about 32 root servers around the region so there is no longer a need for APNIC to dedicate large amounts of resources to this project.

    APNIC communications have been strengthened with the appointment of a new communications officer. The Communications Director now coordinates the communication activities of many different aspects of the APNIC services. The remote participation options for meetings have been expanded with the introduction of audio only streaming and podcasting. Apster has been continuing and has carried various important technical articles in 2005. The Secretariat has also developed several new multimedia resources to help communicate APNIC's services. Some of these were developed to support the NROs in the global WSIS process.

    APNIC is cooperating closely with the various operator groups in the region and has entered MoUs with various ISP associations. APNIC staff attended 37 meetings around the region and globe in 2005. APNIC has continued to work closely with the other RIRs, including providing some staff training for AfriNIC. The ICONS web site was established in 2005 to provide a resource for use of the operator community in the region.

    The second phase of WSIS ended in 2005. APNIC was heavily involved with the other RIRs, through the NRO, in the preparation for WSIS and helped staff a pavilion at the WSIS meeting. This was considered successful in terms of raising awareness of the existing RIR structures and processes. This work will continue in 2006 as the IGF is established. APNIC also cooperated with the UNDP on the ORDIG project. The formal survey from this project showed that IP addressing was not an issue of high concern, but there remains a need to communicate the benefits of the RIR system. APNIC received ECOSOC consultative status in 2005, which will improve APNIC's ability to be recognised in global forums. It remains to be seen just what the IGF will involve and how much work will be required.

    The presenter then reviewed the resource status in this region. IPv4 consumption rates continue to increase. Current projections still predict about seven years of life in the IPv4 address pool. Japan, China, and Korea received the most IPv4 address space in 2005.

    It is hard to accurately compare IPv6 demand over time due to significant changes to the minimum allocation size. Japan, Korea, and Australia hold the most IPv6 address space.

    ASN consumption continues in a linear manner. Nevertheless, issues of ASN consumption are becoming more of an issue. Australia, Japan, and Korea hold the most ASNs in the region.

    In 2005, APNIC expenses were over budget by five percent. Revenues include cash revenues and foreign exchange rate gains and losses. There was substantial gain in foreign exchange rate fluctuations, putting the overall budget into a surplus of US$314,000. The assets of APNIC increased by about 10 percent, again due to the effects of exchange rate fluctuations.

    The presenter then discussed the budget for 2006, which is modelled on pessimistic, optimistic, and moderate scenarios. The budget is then based on the moderate scenario. The 2006 budget predicts expenses of US$6.2 million. Budgeted cash flows take into account the need to maintain cash reserves at the level of one year's operating expenses.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  3. APNIC Executive Council report

  4. Akinori Maemura, EC Chair

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This report summarised the role and recent activities of the APNIC EC. The presenter introduced the members of the Executive Council. EC terms are two years and the office holders on the EC are elected for one year.

    The EC holds monthly teleconferences and face-to-face meetings at the Open Policy Meetings. The EC confirmed the monthly financial reports in 2005 and have recently confirmed the budget for 2006.

    The ICANN and NRO situations are significant issues for the EC's consideration. The EC also coordinates with the Numbers Council members for this region. Mao Wei from CNNIC has recently been elected to serve on the NC from 2006.

    In 2005, the EC made a decision to apply a discount to NIR IPv6 per-address fees as an interim solution while fee structure reform is under discussion. The presenter encouraged everyone to get involved in this discussion.

    The presenter noted that online voting is now being used in APNIC elections.

    The presenter raised concerns about the budgetary function. The APNIC budget in recent years has been very tight. The EC is considering an expansion of the treasurer's function to help in reviewing of the budgetary environment and assumptions.

    The Chair noted that there have been some concerns expressed about the security environment for the APRICOT 2007 meeting in Bali. The EC has met with the APRICOT organisers and received input from the Indonesian organisers. The EC has agreed to continue with the meeting but is continuing to monitor the situation.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  5. APNIC fee structure

  6. Paul Wilson, APNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presenter explained that there was a special session held this week to discuss problems relating to the current fee structure and possible scenarios for a new fee structure. He stressed that this is being presented as an example and is not to be considered as a concrete proposal.

    The presenter noted that in the period from 1999-2002, APNIC was fortunate to achieve healthy annual surpluses. However, since then APNIC has generally operated balanced budgets, with the surplus in 2005 mostly due to exchange rate gains. While balanced budgets are generally good, there are increasing demands for activity arising from the ICANN and WSIS processes and at the same time, APNIC has been continuously increasing service levels and adding new services.

    The presenter reviewed the nature of the increased and new services from recent years. The EC has expressed its approval of these service levels and activities. Therefore, there is a need to provide a more secure financial environment to allow this to continue.

    The presenter reviewed the history of the current fee structure, which is based on a tiered membership base. Although some new tiers have been added, there has been no increase in fees at all, despite the fact that there has been inflation and the decrease in the value of the US dollar has effectively lowered the fee impact on members.

    The presenter then discussed the NIR per-address fees, which are quite inconsistent with the standard membership fees. Per-address fees are paid once only, but can be very high in the case of large allocations. These one-off fees are also an unpredictable revenue stream for APNIC. There is no fee charged for each member of an NIR, but NIRs are charged according to the tiered system.

    The presenter then turned to the rationale for reviewing the fee structure. He noted that it is important to maintain overall revenues, which could be threatened by the formation of new NIRs, to adjust the revenue to offset inflation and foreign exchange rate fluctuations, and to ensure the fees fairly reflect the address holdings of members.

    The presenter gave examples of the differing effects of costs on small and large members, which has often been seen to be unfair to smaller LIRs.

    The presenter suggested that the fee structure for NIRs should be consistent with the standard fee membership fees. Also, under the current system, the members of NIRs are not entitled to any votes.

    The presenter suggested some new fee structure parameters. He suggested a minimum fee of $320, a fee increment of x2 per tier, a minimum tier of up to /24, and address space increment of 2 bits per tier. The presenter displayed examples of how this would determine a new set of fees for different address holdings.

    It will be necessary to consider the impacts on members and on the total APNIC budget. The presenter displayed a table modelling the impacts on these suggested parameters on many different membership holdings. He also presented some likely impacts on the APNIC budget, showing an 11 percent increase in revenues from NIRs and a 14 percent increase in revenue from standard memberships.

    The presenter raised several open questions about how to set the specific parameters for a new structure. He also noted that the RIPE NCC varies its fee levels annually, based on the budgetary need. He noted that it will be necessary to determine what level of discount would be appropriate for members of NIRs and how that discount should be applied. He also noted the need to recognise that NIRs have already paid substantial one-off fees. Finally, it will be necessary to consider the actual impact on standard members and whether it will be necessary to have a transition period.

    The presenter explained that a mailing list has been established to take this discussion further. He encouraged everyone to join the discussion and anticipated that a proposal may be presented at APNIC 22.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was suggested that dropping the US dollar in favour of the AU dollar for fees would lead to more budget stability and should be considered.
    • There was a comment that it is necessary to consider the network engineering side of pricing. It was suggested that the fees should include discounting that recognises the contribution that smaller LIRs make to the global routing table by operating in aggregated address space
    • It was also noted that there is an issue of business aggregation as a result of acquisitions. Where two members are aggregated at a particular level, they may have been responsible for two sets of annual fees, but often do not have enough address space to bump them up to the next fee level. This creates an economy of scale which has a detrimental and unpredictable impact on the APNIC budget.

    [Break 10:30 am - 11:00 am]

    The Chair again noted that the fee structure example presented is intended to eliminate the per-address fee, although this issue still requires more discussion.

    Top

    RIR reports

  7. Joint statistics

  8. Elly Tawhai, APNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation summarised the current global resource statistics, on behalf of the NRO. The presenter reviewed the total status of the IPv4 address pool. She displayed an annual comparison of RIR allocations in recent years. In 2005, RIPE NCC made the most IPv4 allocations. ASN assignment rates have remained low and APNIC generally makes fewer ASN assignments than ARIN and RIPE NCC. RIPE NCC has made by far the most IPv6 allocations of all the RIRs.

    The presenter also noted that all of the statistical data is available on the RIR web sites.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  9. AfriNIC report

  10. Adiel Akplogan, AfriNIC

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and resource status of AfriNIC. AfriNIC has had steady membership and allocation growth in its first year of operation. It received 64 new members in 2005. This was reflected in IPv4 and ASN allocation rates.

    One of the challenges faced by AfriNIC is awareness. Therefore it has put in place a training program in both French and English. AfriNIC is including more IPv6 in the training program in response to membership feedback. AfriNIC has also produced its first CBT training resources.

    AfriNIC conducted two open policy meetings in 2005, where several generic policy issues were discussed. The details of these discussions are included in the presentation.

    AfriNIC registration services have been cleaning up the database. In engineering, they are working to fight spam, including use of greylisting. They are working to make membership processes easier, by developing a member portal, called MyAfriNIC. The whois server is being developed to make it more consistent with policies and procedures. AfriNIC has also been improving its disaster recovery capabilities. AfriNIC has now achieved tax exempt status in Mauritius.

    There are now 5 staff members in AfriNIC and there is a new hostmaster trainee. AfriNIC has plans to employ additional staff in 2006.

    AfriNIC is working to build strong collaborative relationships with other organisations in Africa, such as AfNOG and AfriSPA. AfriNIC has also become an ITU-D sector member to raise its profile in global discussions.

    AfriNIC is now working on an extensive IPv6 awareness program, called 6Mandela.

    The next meeting will be 16-17 May in Nairobi, in conjunction with AfNOG. The following meeting will be held in Mauritius in December.

    Questions and discussion

    • The AfTLD people will be meeting at the Nairobi meeting to encourage more formalisation of that organisation.

    Top

  11. ARIN report

  12. Ray Plzak, ARIN

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and current resource status of ARIN. ARIN had 2,387 members by the end of January 2006.

    ARIN provides funding to bring Advisory Council and Address Council members to each RIR meeting to increase policy awareness.

    The presenter gave a review of recent discussions in relation to fees, especially in relation to IPv6 assignments. He mentioned ARIN's de-bogoning work. He explained that the US government has mandated that all agencies must be IPv6 enabled by 2008. ARIN has accordingly been participating in various forums to cooperate with the government.

    Member Services work is expanding and is also expanding the media being used for member outreach. There has been engineering work to improve the election system and network redundancy. There has also been a lot of work in integrating registry functions. The presenter explained ARIN's increased project management training for staff. The presenter then gave details of ARIN's service statistics.

    The presenter reviewed the status of current policy discussions. The details of these discussions are included in the presentation.

    ARIN 17 will be held in Montreal from 9-12 April 2006.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  13. LACNIC report

  14. German Valdez, LACNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and resource status of LACNIC. IPv4 allocation rates rose significantly in 2005, due to large requests from two national registries. LACNIC had 300 members by the end of 2005.

    LACNIC has been heavily involved in IPv6 awareness promotion in the region, with new policies, fee waivers, research funding, promotion, and training. LACNIC organised the IPv6 Tour for promotion and outreach activities across the region. This was approached more in the way of a marketing session rather than a technical one. More than 2,500 people registered to attend the IPv6 Tour. The success of the tour was reflected in a very large increase in IPv6 allocations in 2005, particularly in the countries that were visited on the tour.

    LACNIC participates in the FRIDA program, which provides small grants for projects related to information technology research in Latin America. FRIDA funded 14 projects in 2005, including three related to IPv6.

    LACNIC helps to deploy the F-root server in the Latin American region.

    LACNIC supports other communities, including NAPLA and Security Network which will both participate in the next LACNIC meeting. LACNIC IX will be held in Guatemala from 22-26 May 2006.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  15. RIPE NCC report

  16. Axel Pawlik, RIPE NCC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation summarised the recent activities, policy developments, and resource status of RIPE NCC.

    The presenter noted that RIPE NCC has been working hard on improving its documentation and request forms. Training material has been revised. RIPE NCC attends other conferences and encourages other events to book RIPE NCC speakers. RIPE NCC has also started an eLearning centre, with a whois course available now and more to be released in 2006.

    RIPE NCC has been working on internal systems. It is now implementing a VoIP SIP service to members. There are improvements underway to the internal systems and a new ticketing system.

    RIPE NCC has been focusing on membership liaison and enhanced cooperation, which has included a program of small regional meetings to spread the contact to members in more remote areas. RIPE NCC has also hosted joint round table meetings for governments and regulators.

    The presenter discussed the corporate governance procedures for RIPE NCC, including an overview of the budgeting process. The charging scheme is something the members are responsible for. Based on an intended budget, the fees are set to cover the projected costs. Generally this means that membership increases lead to declining fees.

    RIPE 52 will be held in Istanbul from 24-28 April 2006.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  17. IANA report

  18. David Conrad, IANA

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation reported on IANA's current activities. IANA allocates IPv4, IPv6, and ASN resources. It maintains protocol parameter registries, maintains .ARPA and .INT domains and does root zone management.

    IANA is currently migrating to RT as the ticketing system. It is archiving all of the paper data that has been collected. It is redesigning the IANA web page and improving its report presentations.

    Previously most IANA tasks were performed manually, but many are now being automated. It is also cleaning up the IANA address allocation registry. IANA is developing a 24 hour call centre.

    The presenter displayed screenshots of the proposed new web site. He also discussed "eIANA" which will provide tools for TLD managers.

    IANA's near-term future plans include implementing XML into the registries, adding address registry function to the IANA whois service, improving automation, and conducting a customer satisfaction survey.

    IANA also expects to participate with RIRs on resource certification. The presenter discussed improving authentication mechanisms.

    IANA will use EPP to handle root zone management, automate .arpa delegation, and make the registry available programmatically. IANA is also currently improving its infrastructure, including co-locating services. IANA has been adding staff to improve service response.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a question about the US government's request for information about the IANA contract. It was explained that this is part of the normal process of the US government issuing an RFP. The RFI is the first step in the process by which the Department of Commerce will decide whether or not to issue a new call for bids on the IANA contract.
    • It was suggested that the IANA reports to the US government rather than the Internet community. However, it was suggested that this is not an either/or proposition and that IANA is able to be responsive to both.

    Top

  19. Election procedure

  20. Paul Wilson

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The Chair explained the EC election procedure. There are three vacant seats on the EC. The EC members whose seats are up for renewal are Che-Hoo Cheng, Maemura Akinori, and Vinh Ngo. The Chair noted the MyAPNIC online voting and proxy procedures that applied for this election. He explained how the ballot papers are to be validly completed, noted the voting entitlements, and stressed the deadline for return of ballots.

    The Chair then called on the nominees to address the meeting.

    Che-Hoo Cheng, Akinori Maemura, Vinh Ngo, and all addressed the meeting in person, explaining their background and hopes to serve the community.

    Sanjay Dwivedi could not attend in person so he provided a brief video that was screened at the meeting. He also stood by on Jabber chat to answer any questions.

    Abhisak Chulya and Michael Saunders were not present.

    The Chair called on volunteers to help scrutinise the election.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    [Break 12:50 pm - 2:00 pm]

    Top

  21. Report on the ASO AC

  22. Kenny Huang, ASO AC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter described the role and composition of the Address Council. He named the current members of the ASO AC representing the Asia Pacific region and explained he composition and role of the AC. He gave details of the AC meeting schedule.

    The presenter listed the current AC activities, which are detailed in the presentation. The AC has been considering the ICANN strategic plan. The AC has also recently called for nominations to the ICANN Board.

    The presenter reviewed the global policy development process and discussed the current status of open policy proposals, which are detailed in the presentation.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

    SIG, BoF, and other meeting reports

    The Chair described the role of the AMM in reviewing the reports and recommendations arising from the SIGs.

  23. Database SIG

  24. Xing Li, CERNET

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter explained the role of the Database SIG and listed the informational topics that were presented.

    The Chair noted that there were no policy proposals in the past two meetings. He expressed his hope that more people will get involved to help keep this SIG active. He also noted that the certificate developments appear to be moving in the right direction.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  25. DNS operations SIG report

  26. George Michaelson, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presenter conveyed the SIG Chair's apology for being unable to attend this meeting. He briefly described the agenda and the and noted that there were about 20 participants.

    There are three ongoing action items. Two relate to deprecating ip6.int and the other relates to ongoing reporting of undelegated domains.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    The presenter also gave the PGP key signing BoF report, which is detailed below.

    The AMM Chair presented a gift to the presenter.

    Top

  27. NIR SIG report

  28. Izumi Okutani, JPNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The SIG Chair noted that the SIG had about 20 attendees. There were four informational presentations, generally presenting activities in the NIRs. The presenter briefly described the reports.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  29. IPv6 Technical SIG

  30. Kazu Yamamoto, IIJ

    Presentation [pdf]

    The SIG Chair provided a summary of the IPv6 SIG, noting that it was attended by approximately 40 people. There were no action items. There were seven informational presentations, which the presenter briefly reviewed.

    One of the most important IPv6 topics at the moment relates to deprecation of ip6.int. Services in this domain will be cut off from 1 June 2006. There were three presentations surrounding this issue.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was clarification of the number of participants in the Latin American IPv6 Tour.

    Top

  31. Policy SIG report

  32. Kenny Huang, ASO AC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter reviewed the SIG agenda, and noted that the SIG was attended by around 60 participants.

    There was only one policy proposal, [prop-032-v002] on 4-byte AS number transition. This proposes a solution to the exhaustion of 2-byte ASNs, arguing that it is better to plan for an early, staged transition to 4-byte ASNs to avoid panic at the end of the number pool.

    The presenter then briefly listed the other topics.

    The presenter noted that [prop-020-001] on the application of HD-ratio to IPv4 allocations has been referred back to the mailing list for a final one month period to determine if there is any support for continuing this proposal.

    [prop-032-v002] 4-byte AS number transition
    The Chair asked for a show of hands to endorse the consensus of the SIG. There were no objections. The Chair referred this to a final comment period on the mailing list, before being referred to the EC for approval and subsequent implementation.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    The AMM Chair presented a gift to the SIG Chair.

    Top

  33. IX SIG

  34. Che-Hoo Cheng, Flag Telecom

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter explained the SIG agenda, noting that everyone is encouraged to join the SIG mailing list or contact the chairs. The presenter briefly listed the informational presentations.

    The presenter also noted that the SIG included a useful panel discussion on IXP collaboration. He noted that this session could use more time in the future.

    The presenter encouraged all IXP operators in this region to consider presenting at future IX SIG meetings. He noted that the IX SIG is growing in popularity.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  35. Routing SIG report

  36. Randy Bush, IIJ

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presenter explained the agenda of the Routing SIG. He noted that there were no action items. The presenter briefly listed the informational presentations.

    The SIG was attended by about 60 people.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  37. Suggested new format for APNIC Open Policy Meeting

  38. Randy Bush, IIJ

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presenter explained that there is a growing feeling that there is too much overlap and conflict between parallel tracks in APNIC meetings and APRICOTs. It was also noted that much of what happens in SIGs may be technical content of general interest to all of the participants.

    Therefore, it is proposed to try a new format at the next meeting. This would include an APOPs session on the Wednesday (including informal 'lightning' talks'). On the Thursday, the morning would be Policy SIG and the afternoon would be for any SIGs that might have more specialised content. The Friday would remain as the AMM.

    Questions and discussion

    • It is proposed that the SIG chairs would act as a program committee.
    • It was also noted that this format would mesh better with APRICOT, which is also under program review.
    • It was noted that it has always seemed odd to have separate IX sessions in APRICOT and APNIC.
    • It was noted that NANOG is actually going through the opposite process at the moment.
    • It was argued that it is very important to coordinate more strongly with the APRICOT program committee.
    • It was suggested that it can be hard to form good definitions of operational material versus general plenary material.
    • It was stressed that the new format will be tried as an experiment.
    • It was recommended that the audience should be provided with guidance as to which part of the meeting they should submit their presentation.
    • There was concern about the effect that this may have on small IXP operators. It was suggested that much of the IX SIG is likely to stay as it currently is, with a split between IXP issues and IXP operational reports.
    • It was suggested that in the RIPE model, the informational presentations would tend towards the plenary sessions, whereas the policy development issues may tend towards the SIGs. However, it was noted that in RIPE and ARIN regions, the working groups are more closely involved in policy implementation than the SIGs are in this region.
    • There was a discussion about how to evaluate the success or failure of the experiment. It was suggested setting some specific metrics.
    • It was suggested that the considerations may be different for APRICOT and standalone APNIC meetings. It was suggested that the SIG chairs should discuss this concept in depth. However, it was noted that the SIG chairs have been discussing this concept for a considerable period.
    • It was suggested to implement the program committee idea immediately and to ask that committee to discuss in more detail what this new format would look like.

    Top

    BoFs

  39. APOPs & ICONS

  40. Arth Paulite, APNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter noted that a discussion of the ICONS web site was included in the APOPs BoF. This was attended by 28 people. The presenter briefly noted the topics discussed in the APOPs section.

    The participants made several suggestions for improving the ICONs web site, including enabling an email digest, promoting it more heavily, incorporating other languages, considering arrangements with CircleID, and encouraging more operational experiences to be published on the site.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    The AMM Chair presented a gift to the presenter.

    Top

  41. PGP key signing BoF

  42. George Michaelson, APNIC

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presenter explained that this PGP BoF was better attended and more active than previously. He noted that there are currently no good tools to handle events after keys have been exchanged.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Top

  43. Open microphone discussion

    • It was explained that the de-bogon article in Apster is very welcome. There was a discussion of the seriousness of bogon list filtering and the damage that can do to networks receiving new allocations. It was noted that ARIN has conducted an experiment to test the reachability of new address blocks. This experiment will be extended and the results will be made available to all of the other RIRs.
    • It was suggested that the bogon problem results from access lists being hand made and not using standard automated tools. It was suggested that RPSL and IRRs could be used to better to overcome the problems. There was a question about whether or not the RIR published data should also be put in routing registries. It was suggested, however, that the real problem is that people use "set and forget" bogon filters. It was argued that people should not be using bogon filters.
    • There was a question from the Jabber chat on whether anyone had any comments about the recent announcement from China to use an alternative root. It was noted that there may be a translation problem and some misreporting, as China is not running an alternative root. It was also noted that measurements of the F and I root servers in China indicate that the normal route servers are not being bypassed.
    • It was argued that a recent rumour spread from an announcement about .CN domains. This was also related to services from an independent company called IDMS. It was noted that CNNIC is actively participating in ICANN work on IDN. It was argued that ICANN's IDN work in the past has not been sufficient but that these services are needed from people in non-Roman character language groups.
    • The Chair encouraged everyone to complete the meeting evaluation form.
    • There was a brief demonstration of the APNIC Interactive CD.
    [Break 3:30 pm - 4:05 pm]

    Top

  44. Lucky draw

  45. An evaluation form was drawn from the box. The winner of the iPod was Shiu Wai-Kay. Further forms were drawn and MaYan, Toshi Hosaka, and Kenny Huang won USB memory sticks.

    Top

  46. NRO & WSIS review: way forward

  47. Axel Pawlik, RIPE NCC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter reviewed the current developments of both the NRO and WSIS.

    The NRO was established as a coalition of the RIRs in late 2003. It is not yet incorporated, although this should be completed soon. The presenter explained the functions of the NRO. The recent activities include ongoing drafting of the ICANN contract, participation in the WSIS process, and engineering coordination.

    The presenter reviewed the background to the WSIS process. He noted the work of WGIG, which culminated in a report produced shortly before WSIS II. At WSIS II in Geneva, the NRO was present and joined with other organisations to staff the "Internet Pavilion" in the exhibition centre and raise awareness of the current addressing system, structures, and processes.

    At Tunis, there was final agreement on a document called the Tunis Agenda. Paragraph 38 of that document deals with the addressing function. It recognises the role played the existing regional institutions, but also made a statement about the rights of nations to manage their address resources. The Tunis Agenda also called for the establishment of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF). The full details of the IGF have yet to be determined. The presenter noted that Brazil recently called for the IGF to be a treaty organisation.

    The presenter suggested that much of the IGF focus may be moving away from number resource issues, which may mean that the RIRs do not need to be as heavily involved as previously. However, this is yet to be seen.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a discussion about the means for participating in the IGF. It has been generally anticipated that much of the IGF will be in open forums, without the formal UN or ITU participation rules. Again, this is yet to be confirmed.

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  48. EC election result

  49. Paul Wilson & Ray Plzak

    The scrutineer reported that there were 1,164 votes in total, 4 were invalid. These were combined with the votes that were cast online. The successful candidates, were:
    • Akinori Maemura, with 1,273 votes
    • Che-Hoo Cheng, with 1,132 votes
    • Vinh Ngo, with 618 votes

    The Chair thanked the scrutineers and congratulated the successful candidates. He also noted that the ARIN elections are exclusively online and asked for opinions on whether to make APNIC elections exclusively online also. The Chair asked for a show of hands on the general feeling about adopting exclusively online voting. There were reasonable numbers both for and against the suggestion.

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  50. Open microphone discussion

    • There was a discussion about the effect that wireless access and laptop use has on meeting participation. There were suggestions that the content of meetings is more important to ensuring participation. However, it was also argued that presenters do deserve at least some attention.
    • The Chair suggested a straw poll to judge the level of interest of reducing the wireless access in some form. There was a show of hands but there was only very limited support for this. There was considerably more support for the current level of wireless access. The Chair noted that it may be necessary for a more formal proposal in order for this issue to be taken further.
    • There was also a suggestion of giving the speakers the options to take this action. There was also a light discussion about the use of real time traffic measurements to judge the level of interest in presentations.
    • It was noted that it is a more common practice for wireless access to be provided. It was suggested that if traffic is blocked, there should still be access to the presentations on the APNIC web site.
    • It was noted that this is an issue of self-responsibility.
    • There was also a suggestion to use the wireless technology present to pull resources together and enhance the overall experience.
    • There was a comment from the Jabber chat asking people to use the microphone. There was another comment that the speakers should have the option to turn off the wireless. There was another comment that there should be 100 percent online voting.
    • The Chair noted that there were 236 registrations for this meeting, of which 151 turned up. He noted that accurate registration is important for planning purposes. He presented a breakdown of participants by country code and also presented a variety of other participation statistics.

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  51. Next meeting

  52. The Chair announced that APNIC 22 will be held in Kaoshiung, Taiwan from 5 to 8 September 2006.

    The Chairman of TWNIC came forward to invite everyone to come to APNIC 22 in Kaoshiung. He noted that Kaoshiung has many similarities with Perth. He also noted that attractions of the city and region.

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  53. Other business

  54. The Chair also noted that APNIC 23 will be in Bali in 2007, although the EC will be keeping a close watch on the security situation. He then noted that APNIC is now issuing calls for proposals to host APNIC meetings earlier than previously. APNIC is now calling for proposals to host APNIC 24 in 2007.

    The Chair again thanked the four Silver Sponsors: JPNIC, KRNIC of NIDA, TWNIC, and CNNIC. He presented certificates of appreciation to representatives of those organisations.

    The Chair thanked all participants and congratulated all those involved in this successful APNIC Open Policy Meeting, including the SIG chairs, Jordi Palet as guest trainer, the stenographers, and all participants. He noted that the general level of discussion seemed to be higher than usual. He thanked ISPAI for providing offsite viewing for the Indian community.

    The Chair presented a certificate of appreciation to the West Australian Internet Association.

    The Chair issued an invitation to attend the informal closing dinner.

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Meeting closed: 5:00 pm

Minuted by: Gerard Ross

Open action items

  • None.

Minutes | APNIC Member Meeting

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