APRICOT 2006

IPv6 technical SIG

Minutes

Wednesday 1 March 2006, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Perth, Australia

Meeting commenced: 11:10 am

Chair: Kazu Yamamoto

The Chair introduced the SIG and explained the agenda. There are no outstanding action items.

Contents

  1. IPv6 update
  2. ip6.int deprecation project report
  3. Technical consideration on deprecation of ip6.int
  4. Progress report for ip6.int deprecation in Japan
  5. JPNIC IPv6 registry service update report
  6. IPv6 deployment in Latin America and Caribbean
  7. Introduction of "Softwires" WG in IETF
  1. IPv6 update

  2. Arth Paulite

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation reviewed the global status of IPv6 allocations and more detailed status of allocations in the Asia Pacific region. So far RIPE NCC has made more allocations that the other RIRs. In this region, Japan holds more IPv6 address space than the other economies.

    The presenter also reviewed the progress of IPv6 assignments to Internet Exchanges and other critical infrastructures. He also explained where to get more statistical information on the web.

    Questions and discussion

    • It was noted that there is an increasing rate of assignment registration.

    Action items

    • None.

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  3. ip6.int deprecation project report

  4. Sanjaya, APNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    The presenter gave an update of the project to deprecate ip6.int registration. The use of ip6.int domain was deprecated by RFC 3152. APNIC stopped accepting new ip6.int domains in June 2004, but now needs to proceed to an orderly end to the lookup service, so that existing registrations can be changed to ip6.arpa registrations.

    APNIC has observed that most IPv6 data flow represents zone refreshes and notifications from masters on updates. There were two measurement points - in November and February. The level of actual queries from users is very low. It was also noted that there were many PTR queries coming from an Linux bug. The current average rate of end user queries is half a query per minute. The rate of ip6.int queries also appears to be declining.

    APNIC has been coordinating with other RIRs to have a common cut-off date for ip6.int services. APNIC has also consulted with the JPNIC community. The cut-off date will be 1 June 2006. Coordination will also take place with the root ip6.int operator.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a clarification of the notification procedures that are being used for end users currently querying ip6.int.
    • The cut-off date is now considered a firm deadline.

    Action items

    • None.

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  5. Technical consideration on deprecation of ip6.int

  6. Kazu Yamamoto, IIJ

    Presentation [pdf]

    The presentation discussed the technical implications of ending ip6.int services. The presenter considered issues of longer DNS server response times and availability of host names.

    Most clients do not use reverse mapping, although some servers do use it, mostly for logging host names or authentication. After 1 June 2006, a name error will be returned if ip6.int names are looked up.

    It was suggested that the number of lame delegations will probably decrease. Therefore DNS response time should be shorter, whether host names are resolved or not.

    There may be some negative side effects. If servers are using "ip6.int only" resolving, then the host name will always be unavailable. Some older resolvers are "ip6.int only", but most are not. One of the most common products likely to be affected will be unpatched Windows Server 2003.

    In general, the side effects should be rare and non-fatal. The presenter described a field test that has been conducted since 18 January, without yet observing any side effects.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a clarification about the update needed for Windows Server 2003. The advice from Microsoft has been to apply the full updates, although it is not clear exactly which patch is required. It was suggested that the fix may be in Service Pack 1.
    • There was a question about the statistical information gathered in Japan. It was noted that the full statistics are available at http://www.v6fix.net/docs/ip6.int/.
    • It was noted that it is good to see an independent test confirming APNIC's observations, but it is still necessary to be very cautious and to be ready to help people who do experience problems. An earlier observation from WIDE suggested that there may be a difference in behaviour between the corporate community and the smaller, home-user sector.
    • The presenter suggested that he would prepare a help document and asked for assistance to ensure that it is available in clear English.

    Action items

    • None.

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  7. Progress report for ip6.int deprecation in Japan

  8. Shin Yamasaki, JPNIC

    Presentation [ppt | pdf]

    This presentation was a supplement to the previous presentation. When JPNIC migrated its IPv6 data, it counted the ip6.int zones and notified the owners of those zones about the deprecation of the service. The migration of IPv6 address blocks has happened in three stages. JPNIC hostmasters notified LIRs at each stage of the migration.

    The presenter described the process that JPNIC has been using to deal with ip6.int deprecation.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a discussion about error messages observed in tests conducted by JPNIC. It was suggested that JPNIC should consider changing the way it constructs its queries as the important issue is whether the appropriate information is passed through by ip6.arpa, rather than ip6.int.
    • It was noted that there have not yet been any questions about this process from LIRs to JPNIC.
    • It was noted that it is more important to encourage people to use ip6.arpa than to discourage them from using ip6.int.

    Action items

    • None.

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  9. JPNIC IPv6 registry service update report

  10. Toshiyuki Hosaka, JPNIC

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation updated the status of JPNIC's IPv6 registry. JPNIC currently has 379 members, 66 of which have received IPv6 allocations. The presenter also noted the assignment statistics, which showed that 904 /40 assignments and 58 /48 assignments have been made to end users.

    The presenter reviewed the bulk data exchange system that has been implemented to allow LIRs to register assignments in the JPNIC registry. The system uses SSL and is more secure and efficient than email updates.

    The JPNIC whois server will be ready to provide IPv6 reachability by the end of the 2006 fiscal year.

    Questions and discussion

    • There was a discussion about the JPNIC assignment data that was displayed. The APNIC statistics are drawn from registry rather than from whois, so similar reporting should be possible.

    Action items

    • None.

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  11. IPv6 deployment in Latin America and Caribbean

  12. Jordi Palet, Consulintel

    Presentation [pdf]

    This presentation discussed activities in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Work that has been conducted with LACNIC has focussed on promoting early adoption of IPv6 and being prepared for the more widespread use of IPv6.

    The presenter noted that organisations with a well-maintained backbone should find it easy to implement IPv6. Ethernet and MPLS make this easier. The presenter noted that in most case, the backbones in the LACNIC region have been upgraded in a matter of hours. Upgrading an access network is more complicated as there are likely to be more dependencies.

    The presenter explained that there is a strong need for training. He outlined the steps that network operators can take to prepare for IPv6 upgrades.

    Until June 2005, there was almost no real use of IPv6 in the LANIC region. Since the LACNIC IPv6 Tour, awareness of IPv6 has been raised considerably. There is also a lot more IPv6 network activity in the region. There has also been a high level of interest at government level.

    The presenter noted that ISPs connected to upstream providers in Europe are better able to provide IPv6 services than those which are connected to upstream providers in the US. OCCAID is providing native and tunneling IPv6 transit services to improve this situation. Its clear position is to not compete with commercial providers but to complement them while they can't help at the time being.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • None.

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  13. Introduction of "Softwires" WG in IETF

  14. Jordi Palet, Consulintel

    Presentation [pdf]

    Softwires is an IETF Working Group, which is trying to improve IPv6 transition mechanisms. The focus is on simple and low cost transition. The presenter reviewed some typical transition scenarios and noted that the Working Group is making good progress and is achieving productive consensus that may result in some RFCs before long.

    The candidate solution for this, appointed in the recent Interim meeting in Hong Kong, is L2TPv2/v3, subject to approval on the mailing list. The presenter encouraged all interested people to join the mailing list. Information is at http://www.ietf.org/html.charters/softwire-charter.html.

    Questions and discussion

    • None.

    Action items

    • There was a discussion about the prevalence of IPv6-only networks. The presenter gave one example of a University in China and some school networks in Europe. He suggested that while it is not popular now, it will grow. He suggested that as IPv6 becomes more prevalent it may become more expensive to be running dual stack networks.

Meeting closed: 12:30 am

Minuted by: Gerard Ross

Open action items

  • None.

Minutes | IPv6 technical SIG

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